God’s Gift of Peace

I shall see him, but not now: I shall behold him, but not nigh: there shall come a Star out of Jacob, and a Sceptre shall rise out of Israel, and shall smite the corners of Moab, and destroy all the children of Sheth.
~ Numbers 24:17

A sermon on the coming King

6 For unto us a child is born,

unto us a son is given:

and the government shall be upon his shoulder:

and his name shall be called

Wonderful,

Counsellor,

The mighty God,

The everlasting Father,

The Prince of Peace.  

7 Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end,

upon the throne of David, and upon his kingdom,

to order it, and to establish it with judgment and with justice from henceforth even for ever.

The zeal of the LORD of hosts will perform this.

– Isaiah 9:6-7

 

Introduction

Isaiah Chapter 9 is a part of the word sent to the kingdom of Judah and King Ahaz. The northern kingdom of Israel had made an alliance with the kingdom of Syria to counter the threat from the rising Assyrian Empire. Israel and Syria wanted Judah to join their alliance, but King Ahaz refused. Israel and Syria responded by attacking Judah in an effort to remove Ahaz from the throne. God sent word to Ahaz through the prophets Isaiah that he did not need to be afraid of Israel and Syria, but rather he needed to trust God. Ahaz refused to believe God’s word and out of fear and desperation, he secretly sought help from the Assyrians. The nation that Judah trusted in became their oppressor.

The surrounding chapters describe various judgments on Israel and Judah because they would not believe and keep God’s word. These judgments include captivity and exile for both kingdom. This time for Israel and Judah was characterized by battles and bloodshed, burning, enemy threats and oppression, darkness and the shadow of death (Isaiah 9:6-7).

The peace promised to Israel and Judah appeared very different from their present reality. Where will peace come from? The peace promised to Israel and Judah will extend to all the earth, but we don’t see it now. Throughout history we have seen monarchies, empires, republics, communism, socialist states, military regimes, and more, but none of those have brought any lasting peace and security to Israel or the world. How will it come?

 

What is God’s Answer?

Men have tried to find a solution and bring peace, but their solutions have tended to only become worse problems. God’s answer is quite different. His answer is to give us a child, a Son, “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given” (Isaiah 9:6). God’s answer points back to the prophecy to Ahaz two chapters earlier.

Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall his name Immanuel.

– Isaiah 7:14

Isaiah went on to speak of this Son who will sit on “the throne of David” ruling over David’s “kingdom” (Isaiah 9:7). This Son is identified as Immanuel and the Messiah King, Son of God promised in Psalm 2:1-12. It is his coming that will bring joy and peace when all enemies are consumed in the fire of his wrath and all their battle garb and weapons of war will only be fuel for his fire (Isaiah 9:1-5).

This Son, Immanuel, will also be named Wonderful, a name that signifies miracle. He will be Counsellor, an adviser in truth and goodness, and a teacher of wisdom. His name The Mighty God means a warrior, or champion. He is also called The Everlasting Father, or father of the ages, pointing to the founding of his kingdom when he returns to reign. Lastly here, he will be called The Prince of Peace, a chief or captain of shalom, which is peace, prosperity, security, and wellness (Isaiah 9:6).

This Son will have “the government … upon his shoulder” (Isaiah 9:6). The kingdom he will bring is marked by abundance and unending peace. He will execute perfect judgment and justice that peace continues. He will sit on David’s throne reigning over David’s kingdom. The jealousy of Yahweh for his name and covenant will bring this King and kingdom to consummation (Isaiah 9:7). The covenant made with David so long ago will finally be fulfilled in David’s Son.

8 Now therefore so shalt thou say unto my servant David,

Thus saith the LORD of hosts, I took thee from the sheepcote, from following the sheep, to be ruler over my people, over Israel:  

9 And I was with thee whithersoever thou wentest, and have cut off all thine enemies out of thy sight, and have made thee a great name, like unto the name of the great men that are in the earth.  

10 Moreover I will appoint a place for my people Israel, and will plant them, that they may dwell in a place of their own, and move no more; neither shall the children of wickedness afflict them any more, as beforetime,  

11 And as since the time that I commanded judges to be over my people Israel, and have caused thee to rest from all thine enemies. Also the LORD telleth thee that he will make thee an house. 

12 And when thy days be fulfilled, and thou shalt sleep with thy fathers, I will set up thy seed after thee, which shall proceed out of thy bowels, and I will establish his kingdom.  

13 He shall build an house for my name, and I will stablish the throne of his kingdom for ever.  

14 I will be his father, and he shall be my son. If he commit iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men, and with the stripes of the children of men:  

15 But my mercy shall not depart away from him, as I took it from Saul, whom I put away before thee.  

16 And thine house and thy kingdom shall be established for ever before thee: thy throne shall be established for ever.

– 2 Samuel 7:8-16

Israel and Judah’s peace, which will extend to the entire earth will only come through this child, this Son promised through prophetic revelation. This child, this Son, came into the world around 2,000 years ago in Bethlehem in the land of Judah.

1 And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.  

(And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.)  

3 And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.  

4 And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:)  

5 To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.  

6 And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered.  

7 And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.  

8 And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.  

9 And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.  

10 And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.  

11 For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.  

12 And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.  

13 And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,  

14 Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.  

15 And it came to pass, as the angels were gone away from them into heaven, the shepherds said one to another, Let us now go even unto Bethlehem, and see this thing which is come to pass, which the Lord hath made known unto us.  

16 And they came with haste, and found Mary, and Joseph, and the babe lying in a manger.  

17 And when they had seen it, they made known abroad the saying which was told them concerning this child.  

18 And all they that heard it wondered at those things which were told them by the shepherds.  

19 But Mary kept all these things, and pondered them in her heart.  

20 And the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things that they had heard and seen, as it was told unto them.

– Luke 2:1-20

 

When Will There Be Peace on Earth?

If this Son was given 2,000 years ago, why is there not peace on earth since that time? Why is our life, joy, peace, safety, security, and all still threatened by enemies?

Matthew wrote of the birth of this Son as the fulfillment of the Isaiah 7:14 prophecy.

22 Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying,  

23 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.

– Matthew 1:22-23

We have seen several names for this Son, but if we back up in Matthew 1 to verse 21, we find he has another name: “And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Jesus, for he shall save his people from their sins.” The name, Jesus, means Savior and is connected with his purpose to “save his people from their sins.” Recall the announcement of the angel to the shepherds, “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, which is Christ the Lord” (Luke 2:11).

This Son is a Savior who saves his people from their greatest enemy. Men with swords, spears, guns, missiles, bombs, or badges is not our greatest danger. The greatest danger and obstacle to real peace, which is peace with God, is from our own sins. If we are ever going to see peace, we need our enemies defeated both externally and internally.

The child of promise was born and the Son was given that he might be have yet another name, the Servant of Yahweh (Isaiah 52:13). The Servant was given that might save from sins by bearing sins in his own body in his death.

1 Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed?  

2 For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.  

3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not.  

4 Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted.  

5 But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.  

6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. 

7 He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.  

8 He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken.  

9 And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth.  

10 Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him; he hath put him to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand.  

11 He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities.  

12 Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.

– Isaiah 53:1-12

So this child, this Son, was given in the first place as an offering for sin. He will bring his kingdom, which will we be an unparalleled time of peace on this earth (Isaiah 11:1-10). So between the manger and the kingdom is the cross in order to save his people from their sins.

 

Conclusion

God has given the gift of peace in the gift of his Son. His Son came to the earth once to put away sin through his own death on the cross (1 Timothy 1:15). God’s Son, Jesus Christ, is coming again to establish his kingdom on earth to bring peace to the world and blessings that have been promised long ago (Acts 3:18-21).

Will you see this peace? Will you see his kingdom and life that does not end? When the Pharisee Nicodemus came to Jesus by night, Jesus told him, “Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God” (John 3:3). You will not enter his kingdom and enjoy his holy peace unless you are born again. Men and women are born again through faith in God’s word, the Gospel (1 Peter 1:22-25). If you will see life, you must repent and turn from your sin and trust completely in God’s gift, his Son Jesus Christ for salvation, the forgiveness of sins, and inheritance in his kingdom.

The World’s Trouble: Chapter 10

And it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment: - Hebrews 9:27

And it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment:
– Hebrews 9:27

Chapter 10

Have you ever had a dream or a thought where something happened in a certain way and then later it did happen? Many people have had intuitive moments like that. Some try to turn it into a career. And I must say, there is money to be made in the world through that sort of thing and there is a long, storied history of people doing that.

So if I have a thought that something is going to happen and it happens, does that make me a prophet? No, it doesn’t. One reason why is because for every instance I could tell you about where I thought something was going to happen and it did, I could tell you of dozens of times where I thought something was going to happen and it didn’t. The biblical requirement for a prophet was 100% accuracy with no margin for error. That fact alone informs us there are no prophets today.

The ending of prophecy is a worthwhile study, but beyond our purposes here. I want to tell you about prophecies of the atonement in this chapter. First, who was a prophet by biblical standard? When we understand that, we understand what a biblical prophecy is, and then we can consider some specific prophecies.

Two primary passages in the law give the biblical requirements for a prophet (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 & 18:18-22). One reason these were given was so Israel could evaluate and authenticate a man’s prophetic ministry. They were also commanded to stone those who were found to be false prophets and put to the sword those prophets who led the people into the worship of any other god.  The requirements presuppose liars, hucksters, and charlatans. From these two passages we draw at least four important requirements.

  1. The man had to be called and sent by God (Deuteronomy 18:18, 20).
  2. The man had to receive revelation from God the people were required to obey (Deuteronomy 18:18-20).
  3. The prophecy had to be consistent with Scripture (Deuteronomy 13:1-5; Isaiah 8:20).
  4. The prophecy had to come to pass as it was prophesied (Deuteronomy 18:21-22).

There were always those claiming to be prophets who did not meet these requirements and God promised to judge them (Jeremiah 14:14-15). We also have a specific example in a false prophet name Hananiah (Jeremiah 28:15-17). A true prophet was a mouthpiece for God. He spoke the words God gave him and those words were authoritative as if God had spoken them directly from heaven to the people.

A prophecy is God’s word by Scripture. That word sometimes included revelation of something God purposed to do beforehand. For example, there was a time when the king of Syria came with his army and besieged and surrounded the city of Samaria in Israel. There began to be a shortage of food that grew so severe two women fought over eating their own sons. Elisha was a prophet who was in the city and he relayed the word God had revealed to him.

Then Elisha said, Hear ye the word of the LORD; Thus saith the LORD, To morrow about this time shall a measure of fine flour be sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, in the gate of Samaria.

– 2 Kings 7:1

So God revealed to Elisha that the next day there would be plenty of food. Many were skeptical how that could be true, especially since the army of Syrians was still outside the city. But that night God made the Syrians so afraid that they fled and left their camp behind them (2 Kings 7:5-8). The people in the city found out and went out and plundered the deserted camp and had plenty just as the prophet had prophesied (2 Kings 7:18). So, had Elisha’s prophecy not come true, he should have been stoned to death as a false prophet who falsely claimed to speak for God.

There are many prophecies recorded in the Bible and we can’t cover all of them. We have been considering the atonement, or covering for sin and I want to consider a few prophecies about the atonement. Before God covered Adam and Eve in the garden, he revealed to them that they needed a Savior who would destroy their enemy and deliver them from the death they were cursed with. He revealed to them that the Savior would be the “seed” of the woman (Genesis 3:15). The Savior would be born of a woman.

Many, many years later, God spoke through his prophet Isaiah. Isaiah prophesied that the long-expected seed would be born of a virgin.

Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.

– Isaiah 7:14

About 700 years after Isaiah prophesied this, a son was indeed born of a virgin in Bethlehem in Judah of Israel. Jesus was born, the long-awaited Savior and seed of the woman.

But while he thought on these things, behold, the angel of the Lord appeared unto him in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost. And She shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Jesus: for he shall save his people from their sins. Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. Then Joseph being raised from sleep did as the angel of the Lord had bidden him, and took unto him his wife: And knew her not till she had brought forth her firstborn son: and he called his name Jesus.

– Matthew 1:20-25

The angel of the Lord revealed to Mary that her son would indeed be the promised Messiah.

And the angel said unto her, Fear not, Mary: for thou hast found favor with God. And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name Jesus. He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David: And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end. Then said Mary unto the angel, How shall this be, seeing I know not a man? And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God.

– Luke 1:30-35

There are hundreds of prophecies about the Messiah in Scripture. Jesus fulfilled most of them and the rest he will fulfill when he comes again. He fulfilled prophecies in the circumstances of his birth, family lineage, the things he said and taught, the working of signs and wonders, and in his death and resurrection.

The death of Jesus was not some unfortunate event that otherwise stopped a promising career. Jesus himself testified that he came into the world to die (John 10:11, 14-18; 12:27). Jesus prophesied about his own death and foretold how it would fulfill the prophecies of Scripture.

The he took unto him the twelve, and said unto them, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished. For he shall be delivered unto the Gentiles, and shall be mocked, and spitefully entreated, and spitted on: And they shall scourge him, and put him to death: and the third day he shall rise again.

– Luke 18:31-33

After Jesus was resurrected to life, he confirmed that his death and resurrection were according to prophecy.

Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory?

– Luke 24:26

And he said unto them, These are the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms, concerning me. Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures, And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behooved Christ to suffer, and to rise form the dead the third day: And that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.

– Luke 24:44-47

His death was purposeful and planned by God (Acts 2:23-24; 4:26-28). Different prophecies in the Old Testament refer to his death, but the most extensive and plain single passage is Isaiah chapter 53. That particular chapter is in a section of Isaiah’s prophecy about the Servant of Yahweh (Jehovah) whom God would send. The chapters leading up to 53 color a picture of the Servant’s work that includes suffering and rejection and even death by chapter 53.

Chapter 53, with verse numbers, is included below for you to read and refer to as I finish this chapter.

  1. Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed?
  2. For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.
  3. He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not.
  1. Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted.
  2. But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.
  3. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all.
  1. He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.
  2. He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken.
  3. And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth.
  1. Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him; he hath put him to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand.
  2. He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities.
  3. Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.

– Isaiah 53:1-12

The chapter has 12 verses in our English Bibles. The verses divide into four groups of three verses each like a poem of four stanzas. Verses 1-3 refer to his coming into the world. These verses foretell him being despised and rejected because of his lowliness. The “we” in verse 3 is the Jewish people of Israel. They confess their rejection of him because they thought him of no worth.

Verses 4-6 speak of his suffering in two ways. First, he would suffer the consequences of sin as a man. He would bear grief and carry sorrows. Second, he would bear the just punishment for sins as a sacrifice. He was wounded, bruised, and chastised for transgressions and iniquities. Again Israel confesses they rejected him because they thought his suffering was punishment from God due him, but they are also confessing that it wasn’t for his sins but for “our” sins he was put to death. These verses also speak of the purpose of his bearing sins for healing and for peace, to make atonement.

Verses 7-9 speak of his death and his burial. His death would be a voluntary death where he fully submitted to suffering. He was the lamb that was slaughtered. Verse 9 is a remarkable prophecy about his grave being with the rich. Criminals that were executed by crucifixion were not given an honorable burial but rather dumped in a mass grave like garbage or the carcass of a dead animal. Being subject to such a death made the burial of Jesus in honor among the rich a most unlikely happening. However, this is exactly what happened when Joseph of Arimathaea, a rich man, sought the body of Jesus and buried him in his own new tomb (Matthew 27:57-60).

Verses 10-12 give God’s estimation of his anointed Servant’s work. God is pleased in every sense and particularly judicially. These verses point to his life after his death and his just reward for his suffering. He will justify many and inherit the kingdom prophesied before. He will make atonement for his people in his death. This is what Jesus has done as was prophesied before.

In the next chapter, I want to break the atonement down into four parts and consider them.

This is a portion of a book that I have been writing. I have decided to post it here in serial form. It is intended to be evangelistic. If the book has merit, I may seek to publish it in some form. Please feel free to share it and I welcome any feedback.

If you wish to read all the chapters in order you may do so here.

The World’s Trouble: Chapter 8

And it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment: - Hebrews 9:27

And it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment:
– Hebrews 9:27

Chapter 8

When I mention the way of salvation, you rightly infer a need for salvation. But, what is salvation? To answer that, we need to look back over the ground we’ve already covered. All men and women are guilty sinners before God. In chapters 2 and 3, we considered what sin is and concluded that everything we do in unbelief is sin against God.

And he that doubteth is damned if he eat, because he eateth not of faith: for whatsoever is not of faith is sin.
– Romans 14:23

But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.
– Hebrews 11:6

Sin is sin because of who God is and we, being made in his image, fail to live up to God’s standard of holiness.

For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God;
– Romans 3:23

In chapter 4 we considered the consequences of sin being condemnation before God and eternal punishment in a lake of fire. We will not fail to stand before God and be judged by him. If we stand there in our sin, we will be sentenced to eternal punishment.

For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.
– Romans 6:23

We need to be saved from the presence, power, and penalty of sin. Salvation in the most general sense means deliverance. Salvation is a rescue. We need to be rescued from the wrath of God and delivered to the joy of God. We need to be rescued from the sentence of death and delivered to the gift of everlasting life. The salvation we are talking about is the whole rescue and deliverance of man from sin unto life.

All human beings are born in sin (Romans 5:12), but the Bible tells of some who are saved from it. There are some who gain everlasting life in abundance (John 10:10, 27-28). Some pass from death unto life.

Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.
– John 5:24

How are some delivered from death? How can God avert their just condemnation and make them fit for his family? How does God put away sin? There is a problem to be overcome here that, perhaps, you don’t see the difficulty of. If God is holy, righteous, and just, how can he forgive sin?

Let me illustrate the problem to see if it becomes clearer. Imagine there is a small town. It’s the sort of small town where everyone knows everyone else and everything everyone is doing. Maybe you’re from such a place, but whether you are or not, you can imagine it. Imagine in this small town that two prominent men got into an argument and one murdered the other. This took place at noon in the town square where dozens of witnesses saw it all and beside this, security cameras captured footage of the whole thing. Furthermore, all forensic evidence and the police investigations proved the man was guilty of murdering his neighbor. The man was put on trial before the judge and a jury of his peers. The prosecuting attorney presented an air-tight case that the man was guilty. The jury needed little deliberation and returned a guilty verdict promptly. Then imagine the judge considers all these factors and pronounces the man, “Not guilty,” and tells him he may go free.

What would happen in such a case? There would be a huge public outcry. The family of the murdered man would probably seek to sue in a higher court. At the least, the people would want that judge removed from the bench. Why? Because he was an unjust judge. He failed to uphold the law. The law states that when a person is proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, they are to be sentenced according to their crime.

Now think about what is at stake in God forgiving sin. We defined sin essentially as a falling short of God’s glory (Romans 3:23). The concept of sin is wrapped up in the very nature of God. The magnitude of sin is determined not by the nature of the act done but rather the dignity of the one sinned against (1 John 1:5; 1 Timothy 6:16). The very nature of God is why sin is sin and is also why God cannot simply pass over sin. How can God be just and justify a sinner?

To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus.
– Romans 3:26

Justify means to declare just, or righteous. It is a legal term meaning to be cleared of guilt. Paul sees a problem in God justifying sinners because God is just himself. If God declares righteous one who is not righteous, then God lies. If God lies, he denies himself and would not be God (Titus 1:2; 2 Timothy 2:13). If God passes over, or overlooks sin and declares the sinner righteous, God himself is unrighteous. God cannot and will not pervert judgment (2 Chronicles 19:7; Nahum 1:3). But Paul is referring to the fact that God has made such a way of salvation that God “might be just,” and at the same time “the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus.”

What we have come to is that the nature of God demands that sin be dealt with. Sin cannot stand before him apart from condemnation. By law, “every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of reward” (Hebrews 2:2), which just recompense is the sentence of death. In order to pass from death to life, something has to happen to our sin. It must be dealt with in such a way that God remains just and also the justifier of the believer.

In the next chapter, we want to begin considering how God takes away our sin so that we bear it no more and he remains just and righteous.

This is a portion of a book that I have been writing. I have decided to post it here in serial form. It is intended to be evangelistic. If the book has merit, I may seek to publish it in some form. Please feel free to share it and I welcome any feedback.

If you wish to read all the chapters in order you may do so here.

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